Stained Glass

Learn about the history of the windows at OCC.

The windows of Orient Congregational

Light is an important symbol in many religions. It represents purity, the heavens, spirituality, and genesis. Naturally, windows were an important part of the church, so it’s not such a surprise that builders began playing with ways to enhance them. Stained glass provides a certain level of privacy that ordinary windows do not without blocking light transmission.

Stained glass windows were once used to educate people who could not read. By looking at the painted scenes in the glass, people could learn about the stories of the Bible and religious teachings. Today, stained glass continues to work in a similar manner as its imagery reminds worshipers of important values and lessons.

All the stained glass windows at Orient Congregational church tell a story about the history of the church. In 1906 a renovation of the church was started. The choir space (currently now the altar) was enlarged. New pews (those still in use today), a new pulpit, and a new gas plant were all installed. An acoustic was installed (a sort of hearing-aid system). New oak wainscoting was fitted. Upon completion of the renovation the church was re-dedicated for the second time. New memorial windows were unveiled. Two of the stained glass windows were made by Payne Studios of Paterson, New Jersey. The makers of the other windows is unknown, but may have also been the Payne Studios, a well known manufacturer of church windows.

There are 14 stained glass windows in the church. Read below about each window and their significance in the life of the church.

1. Christ Knocking at a Doorway

“Behold, I stand at the door and knock”. (Revelations 3:20) – is the theme of this stained glass reproduction of the famous painting by William Holman Hunt.

Jesus stands at the door of a simple cottage home. Judging by the vines and plants, it seems that the door has been closed for a long time.

There is no latch or handle on the outside, the door can only be opened from the inside.

Jesus stands at the door of your heart and knocks. He is not going to push his way in; he is waiting for an invitation. He says “ Behind, I am standing…. Behold means Hey, Look, Hey listen! Don’t leave that door shut when he knocks.

DEDICATION

In Memoriam of
Rev. Daniel Beers Pastor of this Church
1839-1845
Sophia Newel Beers His Wife

 

2. The Angel and the Empty Tomb

The window shows the empty tomb of Jesus on Easter morning, when the women came very early to lay spices beside the body of the Lord. But there was no body at all in the tomb. Instead, angle appeared and told them “Jesus is not here: for he has risen. Go to Galilee and he will meet you there.” (Matthew 28:6). Later Jesus’s friends remembered that he had told them, “I am the resurrection and the life: whoever believes in me shall live, even though he should die” (John 11:25) Today everyone who loves Jesus remembers with joy his promise that because he lives, we too shall live.

DEDICATION

In Memory of
William Youngs
Deacon of this Church 1863-1883
And his wife
Polly Maria Petty
Erected by their Children 1907

Story behind the window

This window was in dedicated 1907 to a former church deacon and founding family scion. William Young (1806-1883), and his wife Polly Maria Petty (1812-1900). But the face of the angel was modeled by the unknown artist on that of an Orient farmer named John Brown, “Who farmed on the Main road land owned by his grandfather and was a great-great uncle of a current church president, John Tuthill”. According to Pat Cavanaugh, wife of the present pastor, The Rev. James Cavanaugh.

Notes by Martha Terry about some of the windows:
March 31, 1907
🞄 Memorial window on East side of church given in memory of
William Youngs 1806-1883, and his wife, Polly Maria Petty 1812-1900
🞄 Given by their children and unveiled on East Sunday 1907 by Walter Tuthil
🞄 Cost: $350.00 plus frames and wire $22.00, installation $8.00,
Freight $4.00. Total $384.00
🞄 The face of the angel on the window was taken from a photo of John Brown, brother of David Brown. Both were sons of Marcus Brown.

 

3. Jesus on a Cloud

After Jesus rose from the dead and left his tomb empty, his friends saw him and touched him and talked with him several times, until on day on the top of the Mount of Olives after talking with them he disappeared, as though a cloud took him up to heaven out of sight (Acts 1:9).

That’s what this picture tries to show, but we must remember that Jesus is not up in the sky, Sure, he disappeared in a cloud, and sure he is with God. But he is right here with us all the time. Just as God is right here with us. Jesus is living and active in our hearts if we allow him to be; and at the same time he is glorious and beautiful, as though lifted up on a cloud much higher than we are.

DEDICATION

In loving memory of
Ernest Preston Beebe
And
Maud Latham, his wife
Fellow workers with Christ
Erected by this church
1924

STORY BEHIND THE WINDOW

In 1924 this window was created in honor of Ernest and Maude Beebe. They were killed one week before Christmas in an auto crash with a train in Patchogue, leaving three sons and a daughter. Traveling with them, but surviving the crash were fellow church members Daniel and Grace Latham and Daniels’ sister Fan Latham.

 

4. Jesus and Mary Magdalene at the Empty Tomb

The Gospel of John tells us (John 20:11) that after the women had discovered that Jesus’ tomb was empty on Easter morning, Mary Magdalene stayed there in the garden near the tomb weeping, wondering who had taken away the dead body and where they could have put it.

In the dim morning light and with her eyes full of tears, she suddenly realized someone was standing near her, and thinking it must be the caretaker of the garden she said, “ Sir, if you have moved the body away, please tell me where you have put it.”

Actually it was Jesus standing there, and she didn’t realize it. But then he said to her just one word, “Mary!” And she looked up so excited and surprised to know that he was not dead, but alive! That is just the moment shown in the stained glass picture, Jesus saying, “Mary!” And Mary exclaiming as she looks up, “Master”

DEDICATION

In Memory of
Cicero B. King and his wife
Emma M. King

 

5. The Welcoming Christ

The figure of Jesus with opening, welcoming arms reminds of how he often invited people of all kinds, old and young, to come to him as friends and followers, He gave a special invitation to people who were tired or discouraged. “Come to me, “ he said, “any of you who are working hard and are weighted down with too much work or responsibility, and I will help you with it.” Jesus also had a very special welcome for children. It seems he liked children. Once when he was pretty busy some mothers brought some children to see Jesus and to have him bless them. The disciples said, “Can’t you see how busy he is? He can’t fool around with Kids now!” But Jesus said, ‘No, no! Let them come. I want to see the children. I want to talk to them and bless them.” (Matthew 19:14) Children can always be sure that Jesus loves them, and wants to

DEDICATION

In Loving Remembrance of
Deacon William T. Brown
And Theresa A. His wife

STORY BEHIND WINDOW

Notes by Martha Terry about some of the windows:

In 1828 a formal re-organization of the church was attempted, but was not accomplished for several years. One of the current windows (Christ Holding the Lamb) pays tribute to those who initiated this. The dedication on the window reads: “Deacon Peter Brown (1781-1857) Phoebe Rackett – his wife – (1782 – 1860) with three others re-organized the church -1828.” The window itself dates from the early twentieth century.

Good shepherd window:
Deacon Peter Brown 1781-1857
Phoebe Rackett, his wife 1782-1868
With three others organized the church 1828
Their daughter was Thirza Priscilla Brown Terry

 

6. God’s Jewels

The central feature of this picture is the golden box of jewels which the angel holds so carefully.

The jewels are made of especially thick and irregular bits of stained glass, so that when the sun shines through the window they show up as brilliantly as emeralds and rubies and sapphires and other precious stones.

These jewels that the angel has gathered represent all the good people who love God and try to obey him. The Bible tells how much God loves such people, and how precious and valuable he considers them. “This who love me,” he says “shall be mine, my special possession on that day when I make up my jewels.” (Malachi 3:17, King James Version).

We are among God’s precious jewels if we love him and obey him.

DEDICATION

In Memory of Deacon Benjamin D. Latham
And his wife
Macy L. Latham

 

7. Mary and Martha

When Jesus came one day to visit the home of Mary and Martha, the two sisters were very excited. They were delighted that he was to be in their home.

You can see in the picture how busy Martha was getting a meal ready, setting the table, and fixing everything just right. Mary didn’t rush around thought; she just sat and listened to what Jesus was saying. Martha actually got kind of annoyed, and asked Jesus to tell her sister to help instead of just sitting quietly and listening. “I’m not going to tell her to stop”.

Sometimes we make the same mistake that Martha made, when we rush around trying to get things done, without listening carefully to what God is telling us. Listening is important. We must take time for it.

God is ready to speak to us at any time, if only we will take the time to listen, in prayer, in thoughtfulness, in quiet meditation.

DEDICATION

In Memory of
Helen A. Terry
And
Fanny Maria Terry

 

8. The Shepherd and the Lamb

Jesus said once to his friends, “I am the Good Shepherd.” This picture shows how the Good Shepherd leads the sheep and carries little lamb., Lambs are born in springtime. They are very cute and lots of fun, skipping around on the grass and having a great time. But they can be a lot of trouble to the shepherd because sometimes they are a bit silly. They get lost.

Jesus told his friends about a little sheep that wandered off among the rocks and got lost, and then couldn’t find its was back. The shepherd had a hard time looking for it, but at last he found it stuck f east in the rocks. He got it out and carried it home, very happy that he had found the sheep that was lost.

We are Jesus sheep; but we can be awfully silly and wander away from him and forget him and do all kinds of wrong things and foolish things. But he is always looking for us, trying to find us and help us; and if we let him, he will bring us home safely, carrying us in the arms.

DEDICATION

Deacon Peter Brown 1781-1857
Phoebe Rackett- his wife 1782-1860
With three others reorganized the church 1828

STORY BEHIND WINDOW

This window pays tribute to all who initiated the formal re-organization of the church back in 1828. Deacon Peter Brown, his wife Phoebe Rackett and three others who were responsible for the re-organization of the church.

 

9. Bible with torch and wreath

This window in its beautiful colors shows the Bible, torch and wreath. The Bible is like a torch. Psalm 119:105 says, Your word is like a lamp that guides my steps, a light that shows the path I should take. The wreath in its circular shape and the evergreen material make the wreath a representation of eternal life. It is also a representation of faith, as Christians in Europe often placed a candle on the wreath during Advent to symbolize the light that Jesus brought into the world.

DEDICATION

Our volunteer Choir
To those who have sung and passed on
To Those who sing now
To those who come after
This window is affectionately
Inspired 1906
Cantate Domino

STORY BEHIND WINDOW

Notes by Martha Terry about some of the windows:
Memorial window on west side in *choir loft at north end of church was erected in memory of:
Rhoda S. Young, Organist of the church for forty years with no pay, 1855-1905
And her sister, Betsy T. Young, Choir member, 1866-1926
Both were daughters of William and Polly Youngs

The choir loft is now the altar.

10. The River and Mountains

The river of life in Revelation represents God’s life-giving presence. God never leaves us; he’s always with us.

Mountains have a logical religious symbolism for Jewish and Christian cultures since they are “closer to God” who dwells in the heavens.

God loves trees. Other than people and God, trees are the most mentioned living thing in the Bible. There are trees in the first chapter of Genesis (verses 11–12), in the first psalm (Psalm 1:3), and on the last page of Revelation (22:2).

DEDICATION

In Memory of
Climra A. Youngs
1832-1916
Wife of Jeremiah Tuthill
Erected by her sisters
Give her of the fruit of
Her hands and let her
Own works praise her
In the gates Proverbs 31-31

 

11. Green trees, river and mountains

A second window that speaks to the same theme. The river of life in Revelation represents God’s life-giving presence. God never leaves us; he’s always with us.

Mountains have a logical religious symbolism for Jewish and Christian cultures since they are “closer to God” who dwells in the heavens. God loves trees.

Other than people and God, trees are the most mentioned living thing in the Bible. There are trees in the first chapter of Genesis (verses 11–12), in the first psalm (Psam 1:3), and on the last page of Revelation (22:2).

DEDICATION

In memory of
Edward D. Cahoon
And Georgia R. His wife

Singing and making
Melody with your
Hearts to the lord
Ephesians 5-19

 

12. Wreath with cross

This beautifully colored yellow and orange stained glass with a cross and wreath. Together, the circular shape and the evergreen material make the wreath a representation of eternal life. It is also a representation of faith, as Christians in Europe often placed a candle on the wreath during Advent to symbolize the light that Jesus brought into the world.

DEDICATION

In Loving tribute to
Rhonda S. Young
1855-1905
Organist
Taetsy T. Young
1866-1926 Choir member
Videla Tetta Merres
Erected by the church

STORY BEHIND WINDOW

This window was erected by the church in tribute to Rhonda S. Young the Organist and Taetsy T. Young a choir member.

 

windows in detail